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unsignedhype.org > Launch > Featured > The music industry is BUSINESS. No different than your 9 to 5. Being a professional artist isn’t like being in a business, IT IS A BUSINESS.

The music industry is BUSINESS. No different than your 9 to 5. Being a professional artist isn’t like being in a business, IT IS A BUSINESS.

The music industry is BUSINESS. No different than your 9 to 5. Being a professional artist isn’t like being in a business, IT IS A BUSINESS.

You as an artist are a business. And like with any business it takes money to make money. Where do you work? How does that business make money to pay you? The music industry is no different. No one accuses you of pay for play when you go to work. You perform a service and you expect to get paid for it.

Promoters, djs, producers, radio shows, radio stations, publicists etc… are no different. They provide you with a service. Now the value of that service varies, some change more for less, some charge less for more… at the end of the day results are the determining factor.

Pay for play actually refers to the practice of paying to get on public airwaves aka FM Radio… because it is subsidized by the government, that’s why they’re public airways. It has nothing to do with artists paying everybody else for the services they want. The government ain’t gonna pay it. If you view paying for the things you need to learn, grow and advance to the next level as something you don’t feel you should have to pay for, how can you expect someone else to subsidize what you need?

If you paid for promo that focused on instant gratification rather than results you could build upon then I see how you can feel that way. Most promoters aren’t in this to help you reach your goal, they’re in this to sell you a service and keep it moving. Its on you, the artist whether you settle for that.

As an artist you do have options. 1. You can try to do everything yourself… do you own graphics, throw your own shows, produce your own beats, direct your own videos, etc. I would not recommend that unless you are exceptionally gifted. If you’re not, you’ll come across as low budget, half assed and as a cheap nickel and dimer. Nobody wants to work with that person. 2. You can get your boys to handle certain things. Again, I wouldn’t suggest that unless they’re exceptionally talented, for the same reasons. 3. Work, get an extra job, figure out a way to generate extra revenue to get professionally served or 4. Get an investor who believes in you and is willing to put up the capital you need to advance to the next level.

There’s more to business that just paying people to run with your music, especially in today’s everchanging industry. First, did you make the proper investment? Did you test market any of your releases? Were you able to identify and zero in on your demographic? What about branding and imaging? Do you have a foundation, a platform that you control, keep track of traffic, how you’re doing, where your traffic is coming from or did you reply on exaggerated/limited social media numbers? Are your social media numbers organic? Its hard to build if you’re working with faulty data. Were you focused too much on making money or trying to recoup your investment instead on ROI (Return on Investment)… was what you invested adequate for the what you wanted as the return… And this isn’t limited to money. Did you learn from your mistakes? Build the necessary relationships you need at every level? Make the proper adjustments. Success comes after failure… after working out the kinks. Did you work out the kinks?

There is so much more to today’s industry than creating music, posting on social media, performing in front of other artists and all the other things artists like to do, then expecting to get on That era, if it ever existed is over.

Old school is cool, but the old way is dead.

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